GIGABYTE A320 Motherboards Add Zen 3 Support

Last week, owners of one of Gigabyte’s motherboards based on AMD’s A320 chipset had a limited CPU upgrade path, if they didn’t want to overhaul their platform. And now? Gigabyte is dishing up beta BIOS updates that enable support for both Zen 2 (Ryzen 4000) and the latest Zen 3 (Ryzen 5000) processor from AMD.

This is potentially great news for budget builders who want to extend the life of their platform. As Intel’s Alder Lake processors come into view, retailers have been dropping prices on some of AMD’s latest generation Ryzen 5000 series chips. Take for example the Ryzen 7 5800X. It debuted at $449, and is now selling on Amazon for $393.99.

Read more @ Hot Hardware

ASRock X570S PG Riptide – AnandTech

The ASRock X570S PG Riptide represents a new entry in ASRock’s gaming-themed Phantom Gaming series, but at the more entry to a mid-level market segment, which for an X570 board might be most people’s mid-range or even high-end for cost. Designed primarily for AMD’s latest Ryzen 5000 processors, it is also compatible with both the Ryzen 3000 and 2000 series of desktop processors, but it also supports Ryzen 5000, 4000, and 3000 APUs. It also has four memory slots with support for fast DDR4-5000 memory, with a maximum combined capacity of up to 128 GB.

Read more @ AnandTech

ASRock B550 PG Riptide – TechPowerUp

Having now reviewed both PG Riptide motherboards, a few comparisons can be made. ASRock uses the same heatsink and VRM design for both the B550 and X570 PG Riptide, which still comes with the same concerns I had previously. ASRock’s choice not to place a heatsink over the SoC VRM section is a real issue for those using an APU or wanting to do any meaningful overclocking. Overall, manually overclocking an AMD Ryzen CPU is a waste of time considering Precision Boost does an excellent job, though. A counter argument can be made for adjusting these settings from the default BIOS Auto values. Lower power consumption and CPU temperatures could be accomplished with a voltage offset and set CPU frequency. The BIOS is not set up for easy navigation, however, undervolting and setting the CPU clock frequency to benefit from said offset is a chore.

Read more @ TechPowerUp

GIGABYTE X570S AERO G – GinjFo

Its purpose is different with a perfectly mastered balance sheet to offer ultra-fast storage and multiple connectivity options. The goal is to have an “optimized” environment for creation. This can relate to video (DisplayPort input), photography, audio, 3D creation, rendering, architecture etc. In view of our tests, this mission is fulfilled with great services in this segment (3D rendering, audio encoding, video encoding). In other areas, the results are average with sometimes a slight decline compared to the X570S PG Riptide from ASRock (memory bandwidth, memory latency, gaming). We also noticed a little more energy consumption at rest.

Read more @ GinjFo (French)

ASUS ProArt X570-CREATOR WIFI – Tom’s Hardware

Powering the CPU on the Asus ProArt X570-Creator WIFI is a 14+2 VRM, capable of driving AMD’s flagship Ryzen 9 5950X at stock speeds and while overclocked. The X570 version we’re testing today includes three M.2 sockets and six SATA ports, which should be enough for most content creators, without throwing in an add-in-card. Along with the increased storage options and fast Wi-Fi, the board includes a 10 GbE port, flagship-class audio (albeit last-generation) and two Thunderbolt 4 USB Type-C ports to round out primary connectivity. Overall, it’s a well-appointed motherboard for content creators looking for an X570 workhorse.

Read more @ Tom’s Hardware

MSI MPG X570S CARBON EK X – i2Hard

MPG X570s Carbon EK X motherboard comes in a huge cardboard box with a convenient carrying handle. On the front side of the package, there is an image of the device demonstrating the work of RGB-backlighting. The manufacturer claims that the board is compatible with Ryzen 2000, 3000 and 5000 series processors.

The back of the package describes the technical features of the MPG X570s Carbon EK X, including the manufacturer’s key technological solutions. Also shown here is the rear panel connector map.

Read more @ i2Hard (Russian)

EVGA X570 DARK – TweakTown

So, it appears vendors have just figured out how to cool this chipset passively, or perhaps the active cooling was never needed. That said, the EVGA X570 Dark is technically an -S platform passively cooled with a large aluminum plate that also reaches the M.2 slots.

Hardware-wise, the X570 Dark is compatible with all Ryzen CPUs back to the 3000 series. It supports 64GB of DDR4 memory over two DIMM channels with support up to 4800MHz. Storage includes two M.2 slots and six SATA ports while networking is handled by dual 2.5Gbe controllers and the Intel AX200 Wi-Fi 6.

Read more @ TweakTown

ASRock X570S PG Riptide – TechPowerUp

While the ASRock X570S PG Riptide isn’t something I would personally buy because it simply does not meet my needs, it is something to consider for gamers on a tight budget. It ticks off all the basic necessities for someone who is all about the plug and play mentality—someone who doesn’t want to play around with memory or CPU settings and rather just lets all the auto-features and CPU boosting do what it is designed for. I think this ASRock X570S PG Riptide will be right on the line for many; some will see it as a horrible product, while others may see it for what it is: a motherboard for a gaming-oriented PC if on a limited budget.

Read more @ TechPowerUp

EVGA X570 DARK – AnandTech

Today’s review focuses on the EVGA X570 Dark that is more than the usual desktop AM4 motherboard. It’s EVGA’s first entry into the market for AMD’s Ryzen processors, focusing on performance and overclocking more than most other X570/X570S boards currently available. Some of the EVGA X570 Dark’s most notable features include two memory slots with support for DDR4-4800, dual PCIe 4.0 x4 M.2, eight SATA, dual 2.5 GbE, and support for Wi-Fi 6. Is EVGA, which had previously been an Intel and NVIDIA only deal until now enough to tempt you to the ‘DARK’ side?

Read more @ AnandTech

ASUS ROG CROSSHAIR VIII EXTREME – Tom’s Hardware

The Extreme performed well in our testing, excelling in PC Mark 10 tests, while showing average to above-average results in most other tests. Surprisingly, gaming results were slightly lower than average, but not enough to be concerned with. Our overclocking adventures with the Ryzen 9 5950X were met without issue–just set it and forget it. Power use was high during testing, but that’s not surprising considering the kitchen-sink-level features on the board.

Read more @ Tom’s Hardware